Summary

Our Score

6/10

Review Price free/subscription

:



If you were thinking of picking this up as an all-rounder, however, we’d recommend you look elsewhere. The IN26 hasn’t been designed with the home user in mind and that’s obvious as soon as you watch a DVD through it. Despite that decent brightness level and contrast rating of 2000:1 pictures just looked a little too washed out and soft for our liking and it took quite a while fiddling with the colour, contrast and brightness settings before we got rid of a slight greenish tinge to images.

Also the relatively slow two-speed colour wheel meant that the rainbow effect was noticeable, especially when viewing bright subjects against a dark background.



Verdict

All things considered, there’s nothing about the IN26 that’s particularly exciting. There are no out-of-the-ordinary features, no headline-grabbing specifications and there’s definitely nothing sexy about the way it looks.

We’d like to say it’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing, that its looks and basic features list belie great performance, or that it’s fantastic value for money. We’d love to like it, but we can’t.

Truth be told, the IN26 is a middle-of-the-road workhorse projector. It will do the job, but unspectacularly. Its picture is no more special than its feature set while video performance is distinctly average. And even that ‘budget’ price is nothing to write home about, with 2000+ ANSI lumens XGA projectors available now from manufacturers such as BenQ for well under the £600 mark.

Previous page
Next page
comments powered by Disqus