Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price £461.99

HTC Touch Diamond2

The original HTC Diamond was one of the company's best selling handsets, so it was pretty much inevitable that HTC would take the Diamond name out for a second tour of duty. However, design-wise this new handset is very different to its predecessor.

Gone is the bumpy, prism-style rear cover that was the signature of the original handset and in its place comes a more practical, flat battery cover. The front of the handset has also been completely re-designed with the large touchscreen now almost filling the entire face of the phone. However, HTC has still found room to add a new touch-sensitive bar along the bottom of the screen which is used as a dedicated zooming control in applications like the Opera web browser, but more on that latter.

The front buttons have also been re-jigged. The call buttons, back key and Windows key are now presented in a neat row under the zoom bar, and are joined by a power/standby button at the top and a volume rocker switch on the left hand side.
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Overall, the new design looks sleek and classy, but it may be a bit too understated for some people's tastes. However, one thing we're none to keen on is the lack of a standard headphone socket. Instead, as with many of HTC's other smartphones, the supplied headphones connect to the miniUSB port at the bottom of the phone.

Annoyingly there's no headphone adaptor supplied in the box, so you really are lumbered with HTC's own wired, stereo headset. That said, the Diamond2 does support A2DP audio streaming over Bluetooth so you could always go down the wireless route.
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Unlike on the iPhone, the rear cover of the Diamond2 easily slides off to reveal the 1,100MhA removable battery and give you access to the microSD card (something the original Diamond lacked). There is a price to pay for this, however, as this version doesn't have the original Diamond's 4GB of internal storage. Still, with cards so cheap now, we'd rather have the flexibility of removable storage than be limited by internal storage that can't be increased.

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