Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

Is HTC obsessed with fruit? It certainly looks that way as with its Touch range of handsets it seems to spend most of its time chasing after Apples, and now with the Snap it's turned its attentions towards Blackberries.

It's clear from the first time you set eyes on the Snap that this messenger device is aimed at RIM's core user base. It's got a similar screen and keyboard layout to handsets like the Curve 8900 and it even sports a similar pearl-style track ball. The question is, has HTC done enough with the Snap to tempt RIM's notoriously loyal user base away from their devices?


As the Snap is aimed primarily at business users it's got a suitably professional looking black finish that's only broken by a gun-metal grey, metallic strip that runs across the middle of the handset. This frames the mini trackball and the six buttons that sit underneath the display. The rest of the case is finished with a slightly rubberised plastic that feels comfortable to hold and means the handset shouldn't slip from your grasp too easily. The Snap is relatively slim with a thickness of just 12mm and tips the scales at a relatively lightweight 120g, so it doesn't look as chunky or feel as heavy as some other messaging devices we've used from the likes of Samsung and Motorola.


Like Holly Willoughby, its rear end is nicely curved and the edges of the cover fit so flush with the front half of the handset that at first glance we though it might not be removable. However, there's a small indent at the bottom that you can use to gently unclip it from the front of the phone. Once removed it gives you access to the removable 1,500mAh battery, SIM card and microSD card slot. We would have preferred if the microSD card could be accessed without removing this cover, but at least it's not mounted under the battery so if you're careful you can hotswap cards without dislodging the power pack.

Next page
comments powered by Disqus