Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price £150.37

Most people think of HP's OfficeJet range of printers as all-in-one machines. While most of them are, the range is actually about inkjet-based printers of all types and the H470 is a mobile single-function printer. Based on a similar technology to HPs dedicated photo printers, but with a separate black cartridge as well as the tri-colour one, the OfficeJet H470 can run from mains or battery and through USB, Bluetooth or WiFi.

In fact, the base model, reviewed here, doesn't include a battery, which is a lithium ion clip-on option, or either of the wireless connections, which are made through plug-in, flash-drive-style adapters. What you do get is a neat, dark grey and silver unit, about the size of one of the Duchess of Cornwall's handbags - rather bulkier than the Queen's…err, we would estimate.

To start using the printer you must lift the lid to create the paper feed tray, while the front cover drops down automatically when you switch the printer on. There's a second top cover, hidden by the first, which reveals the two ink cartridges, one black and the other tri-colour.

The control panel is very simple, with buttons for paper feed and to cancel a job, as well to switch the machine on and off. There are three indicators, for low ink in either cartridge and for paper jams. On the left-hand side is a USB socket for the optional WiFi or Bluetooth adapters and a second for SD and multimedia cards. At the back are sockets for a USB 2.0 PC connection and a PictBridge camera.

Setup with a PC takes the usual form of running the software CD and connecting the USB cable, when instructed to. If you want to make connection via either of the wireless options, you follow separate instructions, as you do if you want to connect the optional battery pack, which clips onto the back of the printer.

The two ink cartridges slip into their holders on the head carrier and are unusually awkward to fit in the right position. Although there are diagrams in the setup sheet, it's quite fiddly to get them in at the right angle and push them up into place.

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