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Fujitsu Celsius ULTRA Gaming Workstation - Fujitsu Celsius ULTRA Gaming Workstation

Ardjuna Seghers

By Ardjuna Seghers

Reviewed:

Summary

Our Score:

5

Indeed the case is an odd mixture of traditional and tool-less design, though Fujitsu has got the basics right. Expansion cards, for example, are screwed in - but then you're unlikely to want to add any cards to this machine for a very long time. Likewise the 5.25in bays use screws, but the same goes here. On the other hand the hard drive cage, which is rotated 90 degrees for easy access, offers four sophisticated screw-free caddies. Each of these caddies is constructed using thick metal with plastic clips and each is fitted with rubber grommets to dampen drive vibration, which is a nice touch.

Of course, only four 3.5in internal bays is very few for an enthusiast case, but with over 2,150GB of storage space as standard you should be okay for a while. Fujitsu has gone for the ideal scenario of one fast drive with the OS and essential applications on it, and two larger, slower drives for storage. Unfortunately the former isn't an SSD, but at least it's the fastest moving-parts hard drive on the planet: a 150GB Western Digital VelociRaptor spinning at 10,000rpm. The two lesser disks are 1TB Seagates at the normal 7,200rpm speeds. Having two identical drives also gives you the option of setting them up in RAID, though Fujitsu has left them as is.

It's difficult to see much of the custom X58 motherboard, as the cooling shroud covers nearly that whole area. However, there is a helpful, detailed diagram sticker on the case's side panel that shows the various connectors and ports. The board features twin PCIe x16 slots both capable of feeding their cards the full 16x bandwidth, twin PCIe 4x slots and two plain PCI slots, though with the dual-slot GTX video cards and Creative soundcard installed all you're left with is a single PCI and one PCIe 4x slot free.

Two of the six SATA ports are left empty, but all six of the Fujitsu board's triple-channel memory slots are filled with 2GB modules of 1,333MHz DDR3 Samsung memory. To be honest the lack of free RAM slots really shouldn't be a problem, since 12GB is plenty for even the most performance-hungry user and should easily last as long as the rest of the machine; consider that most high-end gaming systems, such as the £1700 PC Specialist Vortex i950, still only come with 4GB of RAM.

As far as the processor goes, the Intel Core i7 975 Extreme Edition is the single most expensive part of this PC, coming in at around £770! That's more than some fully kitted-out gaming systems and only £10 less than the CyberPower Infinity i5 Hercules SE with a Radeon HD 5850 DirectX 11 graphics card update. Ouch!

Mind you, you do get the fastest consumer CPU on the planet at stock clock speeds, since each of this CPU's four cores runs at a base clock of 3.33GHz and can achieve a Turbo frequency of up to 3.6GHz on a single core (thanks to a mild overclock, this goes up to 3.78GHz with the Celsius ULTRA Gaming Workstation, and you should easily be able to push beyond 4GHz in your own overclocking since the 975EE is unlocked). However, even at stock speeds this monster's 130W TDP is already well over what one might consider frugal.

Chocoa

November 26, 2009, 6:21 am

Wow, that sure is an ugly 3 grand's worth Fujitsu! Looks like something out of the 80's when Pet Commodores were king.





Good luck trying to tempt cash out of wallets.

Xiphias

November 26, 2009, 7:15 am

It's a nice looking system and I'm glad to see someone realises that gaming wasn't started with USB and older high-end peripherals should be catered for on a system this price - especially as high end stuff can last forever.





I doubt the noise will make it very appealing though, and the lack of blu-ray writer and eSATA is a strange omission on a high-end system. The Peripherals are just odd, if this is a Fujitsu system then why isn't the keyboard an HHKB?

smc8788

November 26, 2009, 2:41 pm

No, those I could do without. The strangest omission from a near £3,000 PC is the lack of an SSD (and Windows 7). Those 10,000RPM 'Raptors are looking increasingly redundant these days, when their price rivals that of an SSD yet delivers considerably inferior performance.

Jmac

November 26, 2009, 3:29 pm

It's a long time since I saw a product that misses the mark on quite so many levels - the core spec is undeniably tasty, but the case (though solid looking) is horrific, the lack of an SSD bizarre, no RAID, last gen graphics tech (the 295 is no slouch, but why have they ignored the 5xxx series?), and Vista?! Seriously?





The inclusion of a top spec Extreme Edition processor is all well and good, but the compromises that have to be made in other areas where budget is even a vague concern are, in my view, inexcusable. On anything other than a total no-holds-barred, money-no-expense monster, you'd be far better off dropping a much cheaper Core i7 920 into the mix and spending the difference on an exotic cooling solution (a 920 under water will in general clock at least as well as, if not better than, a 975 under air), an SSD, top of the range GPUs, a current OS (I'll reiterate - Vista? Seriously!?) better peripherals, and a case that doesn't look like it was designed by a blind man.

J4cK1505

November 26, 2009, 5:12 pm

what on earth was Fujitsu thinking

Rickysio

November 26, 2009, 6:03 pm

Did you guys just look at the spec list and started whining? The 5XXX series weren't even on the horizon when Fujitsu started planning these machines.





And Vista isn't that bad - why all the hate? If you can't use Vista, you lack skill in computer-fu. Blame yourself, not the tool.





Admittedly the casing looks dated, but whoever buys these probably doesn't care about appearances.





PS2 ports do offer something over USB for keyboards - N key roll-over works only for PS2 ports, not USB.

ilovethemonkeyhead

November 26, 2009, 7:24 pm

waiting for lenovo to build a think... gamer, or something. one that's bomb proof, too. in case die hard 4 happens to you.

ffrankmccaffery

November 26, 2009, 8:16 pm

kind of reminds me of that ibm server that i bought for some unfathomable reason other than perhaps for the rather acquired and raw industrial design


and ps2 keyboard ports are a godsend for when your pc just aint having it and refusing to boot up

Caleb9ce

November 26, 2009, 9:02 pm

Overpriced and underspeced. Do they actually believe they will sell these things? All I can say is: FAIL

Peter

November 27, 2009, 1:27 am

Sorry to nitpick but I highly doubt this machine has a FW800 port. From your pictures they look more like FW400 ports to me.

Guye0a

November 27, 2009, 2:26 pm

Designed by managers who most likely ignored the technical staff :(

Kelvin Ang

December 7, 2009, 4:12 am

No eSATA, probably disgusting PCIe bandwidth for the Quad-SLI GTX295, little expansivity. FAIL.





I could assemble a CUDA-rig myself with for the same price and get even more performance out of it. Shame on Fujitsu!

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