Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

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Fujifilm FinePix A920 - Fujifilm FinePix A920

The large size of the camera's body and the slightly sculpted shape of the right-hand side makes it easy and comfortable to grip, and the large and rather clunky controls are solidly mounted and operate with a very positive feel. The A920 might be a good choice for someone with limited hand mobility. The zoom control is a rotary collar around the shutter button, and main shooting mode selection is via a large knurled dial on the back plate, positioned in such a way that it doubles as a thumb rest. Turning this dial is accompanied by an on-screen note explaining what the selected mode is used for.
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The main menu system is extremely simple, in fact it seems almost too simple, as though it had been designed for a slightly more complex camera but has then had most of its options disabled. It consists of only three icons, so even the most technophobic Luddites will find little to intimidate them.
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The simple control layout reflects the camera's simple operation. It is very much an auto-everything snapshot camera, with only automatic exposure or 16 scene modes to choose from. There is no manual control over any other aspect of the camera's performance apart from white balance and exposure compensation. There is no continuous shooting mode, and even ISO setting is limited to fully automatic, which is a bit puzzling since it states on Fuji's website that it can be manually selected between 100 and 800 ISO. The main shooting modes are the standard fully-automatic, a baby mode, an "image stabilisation" mode (which simply sets a higher shutter speed), a portrait mode with face detection, a red-eye reduction mode, and a movie mode. This last item is one of the A920's few real weaknesses, since it can only manage QVGA (320 x 240) resolution at 30 frames per second.

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