Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price £7.93

The game controls like a first person shooter, with the nunchuck controlling movement and the remote like a combination of mouse and light-gun, both changing your viewpoint and enabling you to shoot any Eledees on the screen. However, while you could call it a kiddie-friendly FPS, it’s probably more accurate to describe it as a weird hybrid of Half-Life 2 and Katamari Damacy. The capture gun acts a lot like the gravity gun in the former, but in terms of look, feel and general appeal, Eledees sits a lot closer to the latter.

That’s because, when it comes down to it, both games are obsessed with the idea of tossing away the rulebook and causing chaos in the everyday adult world. Both games have a deliberately childlike visual style, and while Eledees isn’t quite as weird as Katamari Damacy in this respect, it still goes in for flat colours, simple textures and sweet but basic-looking models, prizing the scale and number of objects in the scene over realistic textures or detail levels. Both games also choose very ordinary, primarily suburban environments for their action, starting off inside the house and steadily scaling upwards and outwards (though Eledees doesn’t take this to the extremes that Katamari Damacy does). One minute you’re in the bedroom, then you’re in the kitchen, and suddenly you’re out on the streets. Why this might be cool will hopefully become clear later on.

What’s more, both games make the main threat to your progress a challenging time limit. Eledees does throw in hostile Eledees at later stages, and should you zap more than five of these you will have to repeat the level. It also incorporates breakable items and noise levels in some missions, failing you should you bust too many of the former or make too much of a racket in the latter. However, in most cases your main worry is simply to grab the required number of Eledees in the available time, much as was the case with Katamari Damacy, where your aim was to build a Katamari of a certain size.

But it’s in the mayhem bit that the true appeal of both games really lies. Discovering and capturing Eledees is fun, but the biggest pleasure in Eledees is simply causing a huge, stinking mess. Go on. Get in the lounge, start tossing speakers about. Grab that big plasma screen off the wall and throw it over the other side of the room. Sweep all that stuff off the shelves to uncover the Eledees cowering underneath. It’s stupid, it’s childish, but by golly, it’s fun. As the environments get bigger, the stuff you can chuck around gets bigger too. By the time you’re out on the town streets, hot-dog stands, telephone boxes and even cars are all grist to your capture gun’s mill.

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