Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

Eizo is a name that instantly commands respect. Indeed, it's a company that doesn't really make bad products, just the kinds of products that cost more than ordinary folk are typically willing to part with. While the Foris FX2431, which is marketed as a high-end multimedia and gaming display, is cheaper than the company's bleeding-edge professional efforts, at just less than £900 this is still a display most people will only dream about.

Given the price it's no surprise to find this display is crammed to the gills with high-quality circuitry, a premium VA panel and loads of connectivity. However, while this is ostensibly a consumer product, it still retains Eizo's habitual industrial looking design. This is a large, chunky monitor finished entirely in matte black plastic, not the kind of monitor that'll grace you're living room.

So it's no style icon, but where it impresses is in its build quality, which is in a completely different league to the vast majority of monitors, even those that cost £400 or more. Despite weighing in at a substantial 10.5kg with its stand (8.1kg without), it remains very stable and well planted.

It's not necessarily the most adjustable screen, though. It doesn't, for instance, have pivot built into the stand, though in every other respect it can't really be faulted. It rotates on its stand 172 degrees left and right, tilts 35 degrees up and five degrees down, while the height adjustment range is 24cm.

Much of its stability can be attributed to the slightly unusual height adjustment mechanism, where the monitor slides up and down on rails. It's not the easiest system use, you need to grab the screen with two hands to move it up and down, but once in place it isn't budging!

Being a proper 24in monitor with a 16:10 aspect ratio, the FX2431 sports the usual 1,920 x 1,200 native resolution. While statistics can be quite misleading, especially where monitors are concerned, on paper the VA panel ticks all the right boxes. It's rated at up 360 nits brightness and has a 1,000:1 native contrast ratio, boosted to up to 2,000:1 in dynamic mode. This latter figure is pleasingly realistic, eschewing the kind of ridiculous claims some manufacturers choose to make.

Response times are quoted at 6ms grey-to-grey and 16ms black-white-black, both fairly typical values and not unrealistically low. Finally, there's the 96 per cent Adobe RGB colour gamut, which is about what you'd expect for a high-end CCFL backlit LCD monitor such as this.

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