Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

CyberPower Infinity i7 Phoenix Gaming PC - CyberPower Infinity i7 Phoenix Gaming PC

As for gaming, here the CyberPower Infinity i7 Phoenix also lives up to its price tag, as it simply annihilates everything we've reviewed before. On the audio side of things, the Creative X-Fi Gamer sound card brings EAX 5.0 HD for the best sound effects in games without placing much additional load on the CPU. Though a discrete sound card is no longer the necessity it once was in terms of features, they still greatly surpass onboard solutions for sheer quality.

As ever though, graphics is the most important part of any gaming setup and the AMD/ATI Radeon 5970 doesn't disappoint. If you want all the details on this card it's worth reading our review, but basically it puts two 5870 chips with slightly lower clock speeds on a single board using an internal CrossFire interface.
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Only in Call of Duty does the quad-SLI graphics setup of the £2750 Fujitsu Celsius ULTRA even stand a chance, and then only as long as anti-aliasing (AA) is not applied. With AA on, the Radeon HD 5970 again comfortably pulls ahead of its rival's twin nVidia GeForce 295GTxs. Of course in DirectX 11-compatible titles the 5970 has no competition.

In the more complex and demanding Crysis running on DirectX 10, CyberPower's system also wins the day. Again we'll show you the chart here as it not only demonstrates this computer's lead over the ULTRA but also the perfectly stepped performance of the Radeon HD 5970 over the Dino PC's 5870, the Wired2Fire's 5850 and the Scan's 5750; basically the top four Radeon cards in AMD's lineup.

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Crysis runs at a fairly smooth 33.6fps average on Very High Detail with the resolution set to 1,920 x 1,200, while even owners of 30in monitors can run the game on High Quality at 2,560 x 1,600 and maintain a reasonable 31fps.

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