Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

The control layout is also identical to the previous Z-series models, with a small round D-pad, four small rectangular buttons and a separate button to instantly activate the video recording mode. Despite the camera's diminutive dimensions the controls manage to avoid being fiddly, leaving plenty of room to grip the camera, and are clearly labelled and also have nice tactile feedback. Olympus please take note.

Like all of Casio's cameras the Z25 has a dual menu system; a three-section main menu that controls all camera functions, and a sidebar live menu that control up to eight frequently used functions. The functions that appear on the live menu can be selected by the user. For such a small and relatively cheap camera the Z25 has a decent range of features, including Casio's excellent manually adjustable auto-shutter system, which detects motion blur and also acts as a smile-activated shutter release. It also has a good face detection system and multiple AF modes including pan-focus and manual focus.

Unlike some recent point-and-shoot compacts the Z25 has multi-zone, centre weighted and spot metering, adjustable sharpness, contrast and saturation, adjustable flash output and a range of colour filters. It also has a lighting booster feature for shooting in high contrast situations, but to be honest this doesn't work as well as some similar systems that I've seen. It also has 1280 x 720 video recording with mono audio. As is usually the case the optical zoom cannot be adjusted while recording, but the dedicated video button does mean it can start recording instantly.

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