Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

Broadband, once a luxury envied by those still stuck in the dark ages of dial-up Internet, has in a relatively short time become just another must-have service at home; along with electricity, gas and water. ISPs are having to become ever more cunning when trying to convince customers that their broadband offerings are better than others', or offer something that can't be had elsewhere.

BT, as evidenced by its (often extremely annoying) adverts, is well aware of that fact. To capitalise on this, offering services such as BT Vault online backup storage, BT Vision IPTV or BT Total Broadband Anywhere. It's the latter that I'm looking at today, so let's dive in.

BT Total Broadband Anywhere is an extension to BT's top-end broadband package that offers, for every-so-slightly under £5 a month (thanks VAT cuts!) and the signing of an 18 month contract, a handset which can be used to take BT broadband out of the home. Or so the marketing blurb suggests.

The reality is slightly different. The broadband package of an (up to) 8Mbit connection, unlimited broadband with 5GB of online storage and BT's Home Hub router isn't too bad. And there is the option to add BT Vision, albeit for an extra monthly fee.

The ToGo handset, as the mobile is referred to has, at first glance, a pretty meagre package. 50 cross-network minutes, 50 text messages will probably be too little for most mobile users - although there are package options to increase that allowance. Moreover, 10MB of wireless data on a GPRS handset is decidedly not what I'd call mobile broadband.

However, in addition to the above allowances, BT ToGo also offers access to its vast OpenZone Wi-Fi network. When connected, it's possible to make phone calls over the 'net and access the Internet, be that for browsing, sending emails or anything else, the foremost of those options being the most notable, as it compensates the otherwise miserly 50 minute calls allowance.

BT Broadband Talk, as the Internet phone call service is called, isn't limited to hotspots, though, but rather works over any Wi-Fi-enabled Internet connection. If you happen to make most of your phone calls at work, and have access to Wi-Fi there, the small data and minutes allowances might not be an issue.

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