• Recommended by TR
AMD ATI Radeon HD 4850


Our Score


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Call of Duty 4 has to be one of our favourite games of last year. It brought the Call of Duty brand bang up to date and proved that first person shooters didn't need to have the best graphics, or the longest game time. It was just eight hours of pure adrenaline rush that constantly kept you on edge.

We test using the 32-bit version of the game patched to version 1.4 FRAPS is used to record framerates while we manually walk through a short section of the second level of the game. We find a framerate of 30fps is quite sufficient because, although the atmosphere is intense, the gameplay is less so - it doesn't hang on quick reactions and high-speed movement.

All in-game settings are set to their maximum and we test with 0xAA and 4xAF. Transparency anti-aliasing is also manually turned on through the driver, though this is obviously only enabled when normal AA is being used in-game.

Even though the HD 4850 is again beaten by the GTX 260, it once again puts in a good performance compared to its price competitors and looks like a decent option. This title does again highlight the huge difference in performance between the standard clocked HD 4870 and HD 4850 and the benefits of overclocking the latter.

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July 21, 2008, 4:11 pm

Very interesting results, especially Crysis. Given the feature set is identical between the 4850 and 4870 you'd expect the only differences be due to slightly increased clock speed and significantly increased memory bandwidth. That being the case the OC'd 4850, especially if the memory is OC'd, should bring performance closer to the 4870 - as in fact the other games show.

So what's going on in Crysis - driver optimisations for the 4870? Heat throttling for the 4850?


February 6, 2009, 10:16 pm

I got this card (the 4850) built-in the Dell Studio XPS (currently in production, hasn't shipped yet). I am not a gamer at all and personally only care about the connections that the card allows me to do: I noticed two DVI outputs and one s-video output. Does this mean that I can connect simultaneously (a) two computer monitors (one for each DVI) plus a TV through the s-video or (b) one computer monitor to one DVI output and a TV to the other DVI output? I would really love to be right in my guess. And this is pure guess, as I am not very familiar with the terminology of graphics cards (my old PC packs a whopping 64MB graphics card and I don't even know the brand). I would really appreciate it if someone would clear this little doubt of mine. Thanks.

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